Archive for the ‘Entrepreneurship’ Category

Olin Business School students learn entrepreneurship by working abroad

Entrepreneurship is a global phenomenon and to prove it 11 Olin Business School students traveled to Hungary in May to work with start-up companies in Budapest.

The trip is an integral part of Clifford Holekamp's course, "Danube Venture Consulting Program" which was offered for the second time this year. Holekamp is a senior lecturer in entrepreneurship at Olin and initiated the consulting project with a private equity firm in Hungary.

Read the rest of this entry »

Derek Elliott ? Entrepreneurship Myths

The entrepreneurship process is shrouded with many unlogical myths. So the emerging new business persons should be more careful because falling for them can be more dangerous to any businesses health.

The growth and performance of their startups of the biggest myth entrepreneurs depends more on their entrepreneurial talent than on the businesses they choose. All the business owners want the people to have a realistic understanding of things. The Field chosen by the person for starting a business plays a key role and has a huge effect on the odds too. Some of the myths used are,

Read the rest of this entry »

Entrepreneurship is Not for Everyone…5 Myths and Realities of Entrepreneurship

With the economy in shambles, talk of self-employment is on the rise. Americans are beginning to realize that dedication and loyalty to someone else's business is no guarantee of security, and working for themselves is sounding better and better. However, many people harbor significant misperceptions about what entrepreneurship really means. The myths and realities of entrepreneurship should be well understood by anyone thinking about going out on their own.

Myth #1: Starting my own business means I will have more free time.

Reality: For most startups to succeed, the entrepreneur must put in extraordinary hours, especially during the early stages. Every detail of the business requires attention from you and your to-do list will grow faster than it does at a 9 to 5 job. Carving out time for yourself will be necessary, but difficult because you will forever be thinking of the thousand things that should already be done, but aren't. If you are looking to build a thriving company, don't count on spending lots of time on the golf course, at least not in the first year or two.

Myth #2: Owning my own business will solve all my financial problems.

Reality: While it is true that business ownership is the only way to dramatically increase personal wealth (besides winning the Lottery), it does not happen overnight. After months of work to get your venture to the break-even point, your next objective is ramen-profitability. That is, a successful startup will keep you and your family in ramen noodles until the next sales growth spurt. Plan to sink every dime you can into your startup for at least the first year. It might be tough, but the payoff is significant -- and one you aren't likely to find crawling up someone else's corporate ladder.

Myth #3: My idea is so good it will sell itself.

Reality: No, it won't. Building sales requires time, money, effort, and planning, no matter what you are selling. Even if you are starting with a great client ready to buy, you must always be looking for the next great client. Marketing is at the heart of all businesses -- no marketing, no sales.

Myth #4: Self-employment is easier than working for someone else.

Reality: Working for yourself is far more demanding than any job. The business begins and ends with you. Sick days, hour lunches, and leaving work at work are perks reserved for employees, not the boss. Until you have grown your venture to the point of having a trustworthy staff to cover all critical tasks, it is on you. However, successful entrepreneurs are driven by the control and autonomy that come with self-employment and enjoy the feeling of being responsible for every outcome -- good or bad. If entrepreneurship were easy, more people would be on board. As it is, only 7.2% of Americans are self-employed -- far fewer than most other industrialized nations.

Myth#5: Running my own company means I get to be my own boss.

Reality: It's true! You do get to be your own boss, as well as your own accountant, your own lawyer, your own marketing department, your own support staff -- the list goes on. While entrepreneurs do have more control over what they do and when and how they do it, they also have the added pressure of all the responsibility for the success and failure of the business. Entrepreneurs also trade in a single boss at a regular job and receive hundreds or thousands of bosses -- your customers. Your customers are the lifeblood of your business. It is your responsibility to provide a product that benefits them and offer customer service that keeps them satisfied and coming back for more.

As your business grows, your responsibilities expand to include keeping your employees happy as well. No longer stuck with a boss? Now you have thousands of them.

Read the rest of this entry »

Derek Elliott ? Keys to Successful Entrepreneurship- Preparation and Planning

Most of the top businessmen have their own products and can easily associate the success that could possibly come with it.

At first you have to extensively plan about your new idea or concept, without thinking ahead surely you might encounter unforeseen difficulties with the management or cashflow. Some of these qualities to become an Entrepreuner, are built-in parts of your inherent personality, and some of them get developed over time.Entrepreneurship is very appealing to women in leadership.

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertising

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Links