Posts Tagged ‘Success’

Key to Success in Small Business – Dynamic Leadership

Every small business owner starts out with the dream of watching his small business grow until it is no longer small. Every small business leader is looking for ways to make his small business more successful. But very few small business owners know what it takes to be successful in their ventures. Most small business owners are knowledgeable about one specific area of their business, but overall, may not understand how to effectively manage their small business venture. There are two key times when dynamic leadership of a small business is especially crucial: During significant downturns, and during explosive growth.

It seems obvious that a small business needs a dynamic leader during times of stress and struggle. This is especially true in today's tough economic climate. When a small business is struggling, it needs a leader who can step in, identify the core problem, and implement a plan to correct it. Sometimes finding and implementing the solution to the small business challenge lies outside of the scope of its leader's abilities or skill set. One of the most important traits of any small business leader is recognizing when he/she is in over their head, and seeking help from a third party expert in the field. Many small businesses have failed because the leader/owner failed to recognize the need to bring in outside resources to correct the core problem. Or worse, the small business leader thought they had identified the core issue, when in fact they were focusing on a symptom of the problem, rather than getting to the root or core cause. A dynamic leader in a small business will recognize when it is prudent and necessary to bring in outside counsel or professional advice to correctly identify core weaknesses or "fatal flaws", and to create and implement a plan to correct the issue.

Less obvious is the need for dynamic leadership during times of explosive growth. It is ever small business owner's dream to watch the company's revenues triple year over year. However, most don't pause to consider the potentially devastating effects of explosive growth to a small business. As company revenues increase, so do expenses and capital needs. If a small business does not have adequate sources for working capital in place, the small business will likely fail, despite rapidly rising sales. Furthermore, a small business infrastructure may not be adequate for explosive growth. Its personnel may not be adequate for the challenge, both in capacity and ability. Any small business should look to its leader to develop and implement a structured growth strategy. Without a solid growth strategy in place, explosive growth can be equally as devastating for a small business as is rapidly decreasing sales. A small business must look to its dynamic leader to guide it through times of rapid growth, and this leader must recognize within himself/herself their own abilities and capacities, and may need to seek expert help in structuring a sound strategic growth strategy.

In conclusion, it is the dream of every small business owner to watch his or her company grow. But uncontrolled and unstructured growth are equally devasting to a small business as is rapidly shrinking sales. A small business relies upon a dynamic leader to guide it through both times of prosperity, and times of struggle.

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Online Success Blueprint® System: Online Marketing Made Easy

  • This 7-step program will walks you through using the Internet and information products to skyrocket your profits AND your free time
  • Learn how to convert your current website into a lead-generating & money-making machine
  • Learn how-to leverage your current knowledge into simple information products & programs that will sell themselves 24-7
  • This product will allow you to WORK LESS while you maintain, double, or even TRIPLE your current income!
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Bring Deliverability and Design Together to Maximize Email Marketing Success

January 28, 2009 — Tips for getting your permission-based marketing emails into the inbox and the actual design of the email are closely linked. Here you will find useful information on getting into the inbox, email design tips, and the nexus between the two.

If you are just getting back into email marketing after a break, are new to it, or are sending to an old list, make sure to ramp up your sending. This does not take long. If you have a large list, do not send to your whole list all at once but ramp up incrementally to maximize email marketing deliverability.

It is very important to keep a clean list. Too many hard bounces (email addresses that do not exist any more) can hurt your reputation with the ISPs. Pay close attention to keeping a clean list and purge as many bad addresses off the list as you can before you even send through a new Email Service Provider (ESP). You want to get off on the right foot with good delivery.

Keep in mind that the worst thing you can do to build your email list is to harvest emails off of Web sites, as this a flagrant violation of the CAN-SPAM act.

In addition, do not buy a list from some guy on the Internet who promises you the subscribers have all opted-in. They may have opted-in to hear from someone, but not from you. For you, they are likely to hit the spam complaint button along with the many others to whom this guy has sold the list. Sending to this sort of list will hurt your ability to reach your best customers or prospects.

No matter which ESP you choose, they will assign you an IP address – either shared or private. This IP address, not your email address, is the “Caller ID” of every email that goes out, whether a personal message or email marketing. Make sure you setup a Sender Policy Framework (SPF) record that matches the IP your ESP assigned you with the sending domain (yourcompany.com). If you do this, you will be in the elite of email marketers who are following this optimal practice and will have an advantage. If you need help, ask your ESP. If you are a techie or know one, setting up an SPF record in your Domain Name Service (DNS) records does not take long. With many ESPs, you can determine the IP (shared or private) by looking in the settings of the account; with some ESPs you may have to ask them what IP address your emails are coming from.

Here are some additional tips on getting your emails through the spam filters.

Email Marketing Design: The Coin of The Realm

Good email design is not only more appealing to recipients and better for click throughs, but it also makes the spam filters look more kindly on your emails. This matters greatly when it comes to reaching the inbox, but do not forget that people like well designed emails better than something that is hard on the eyes. Your success with achieving your email marketing goals — including click-through-rates (CTR) and conversions — will be greatly enhanced by aesthetically pleasing email design.

One of the top guidelines for email marketing design is not to send out an email that is too heavy graphics or, much worse, one giant graphic. The guiding principle is 60 percent text, 40 percent graphic. Many email recipients view emails in a preview pane, so the top left corner is an ideal location for brand placement and a good enticing lead. Also, keep in mind that many email clients have graphics turned off by default so you have to entice people to click the button that turns graphics back on. The best way to do that is to leverage strong content, a well-designed email, and a good balance between text and graphics. It is always a very bad idea to send out an email that is one large graphic because not only will it lessen the chances that people will read it, but also because spam filters hate one large graphic emails.

It is crucial to remember to include ALT text for any images you include in your emails. The reason is that anything you are trying to communicate through images will be lost until many users turn on the graphics, which usually can be accomplished with a quick click. Entice them with descriptive ALT text that describes the graphic. If a picture is worth a thousand words, then give your recipients a reason to view those images.

Tables are back – which may seem counterintuitive to those of you who have been involved in a Web design project. Tables are an important element of email marketing design. You can use CSS but it must be inline CSS if you want it to work. Consider tables in your email design and play close attention to using table attributes.

Be aware of the inherent limitations of email programs as compared to Web browsers. Consider that the optimal email width is recommended at 600 pixels wide to accommodate for various browsers and mobile devices. Try to hit this range to avoid wide and unwieldy emails that few will want to read through. You probably want to avoid very long emails as well.

Again, keep in mind that while Web browsers are developed to handle javascript, flash, etc., many emails programs simply cannot handle the fancy stuff.

In addition, make sure to have a link in your email that enables your recipients to view the email as a Web page. Most ESPs provide a very easy way to accomplish this task. Some people will just prefer to view your email as a Web page.

If you combine good design for email with an awareness of both the spam filters and an aesthetically pleasing email for your audience, then you have a recipe for success. Email marketing can be hard work but when done well it yields the highest ROI of any other marketing tactic, which, according to the Direct Marketing Association is nearly $57 for every dollar invested.

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Find Success Through Persistent Self-Motivation

What is it about a business that can wreck someone? Have you experienced that pain before? It can break you down and make you wonder if there is even a possible way out of it. Have you put your whole heart and trust into something that didn't work out? I have. I know what that is like and I sympathize with you.

I remember starting businesses with the thoughts of millions of dollars, success, luxuries and enjoyment beyond comprehension. I would stay up all night dreaming about how I was going to be successful with my business. I would do anything to create that success. I would read, study, market, ask questions, whatever it would take and in the end fear set in and hurdles seemed to be too big for me to understand.

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