The Handbook of Online Marketing Research: Knowing Your Customer Using the Net

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The Handbook of Online Marketing Research examines all the latest techniques and trends used to conduct online research, including how to leverage existing sources, online chat-based sessions, email feedback, online focus groups, and much more. Now, just like larger companies, small– and medium–sized companies can learn vital information like the age, gender, and income of its users, and how they respond to different aspects of the products and those of its c... More >> The Handbook of Online Marketing Research: Knowing Your Customer Using the Net

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5 Responses to “The Handbook of Online Marketing Research: Knowing Your Customer Using the Net”

  • Anonymous says:

    This book is packed with good information. I saw the review in Wired,
    and couldn’t agree more. I’ve been using the resources identified in
    the book and on the companion website. My company did a little
    research with some free web survey technology, which wasn’t very
    useful. Not only does this book explain why (in a way I can
    understand and explain to my managers) but it also explains how to do
    it right. Lots of good examples thrown in as well. We’re gearing up
    to run some surveys, and so far, all is well. … — I suppose this
    book isn’t for statisticians, but then, the authors say that up front.
    All in all, this is one of the better “how to” books I’ve
    seen for the web.
    Rating: 5 / 5

  • Anonymous says:

    If you are a professional market researcher this book is far too elementary. For instance, you probably don’t need standard deviation explained to you.

    If you are a web developer, the examples seem downright amateurish. For instance, the authors provide some Javascript code for selecting website visitors at random, with the instruction that you will need to change variables for it to work for your purposes. That’s what functions that accept parameters are for: then you can leave the core code alone and re-use it as often as you want.

    Worse yet, the authors refer to “Tickle” as an alternative to ASP or CGI. It would seem they have not done their research. It’s “Tcl”, or Tool Command Language. Yes it is pronounced “Tickle”, but the fact that they don’t know how to spell it would seem to indicate they have only heard about it and haven’t read anything about it, which is further supported by their assertion that Tcl/Tickle needs to run on Windows. This is patently untrue: like Perl (not “Pearl”) it was originally developed for Unix and only more recently has been ported to Windows.

    This book is especially at its worst if you have both market research and web development experience. For instance, the authors suggest using cookies and javascript for randomizing sample to avoid bias. However, they never mention that users can turn off both of these features. Excluding people who turn off cookies and Javascript would introduce a similar bias as not reaching unlisted numbers in telephone research.

    Now that I’ve bought this book, the only value I can see that I will get from it is for examples about how not to do web surveys.
    Rating: 1 / 5

  • Anonymous says:

    At best this book is a very general overview of market research concepts that are not even specific to online surveys. For instance, don’t “lead” the respondent.

    Its best isn’t very good though. For instance, the authors repeatedly refer to Excel as a bona fide analysis tool. No professional worth his or her salt would use such a tool for this purpose.

    At its worst this book is full of misinformation about web development. Before I bought this book, I wish I could have read the review that points out the authors’ total misconception about Tcl, or “Tickle” as they call it.

    Even more incredibly, there is an entry for “Tickle” in the index!

    If you are at an intermediate level or higher in either market research or web development, this book is completely worthless.
    Rating: 1 / 5

  • Finally, someone has come out with the bible for how to do intelligent, well researched marketing and customer analysis online. Having worked for several online ventures, I only wish that their marketing department had had the benefit of reading this text. Grossnickle and Raskin provide examples based on real-world experience, and insight as to how to effectively conduct research and get useful data from that research. Each chapter carefully examines how to approach the various ways of conducting online market research, and how to get the most from that data, in a very clear, very precise manner.

    This book should be required reading for any company trying to figure out who their audience is and understanding the space that they are in.
    Rating: 5 / 5

  • Anonymous says:

    If you are a marketing professional, you most likely leverage the power of the Internet in some form for research. This book brings forth the broad tactics (from segmentation to targeting) in a digestible format. If you haven’t used the power of the Internet to drive your company’s research strategy — you’re missing the boat. Make sure to pick up a copy of this book to jump start your learning process.
    Rating: 5 / 5

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